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SLAVIC 175 A: The Slavic Text And Its Context

Image of Map Showing Nobel Prize Winners
Meeting Time: 
T 11:30am - 1:20pm
Location: 
* *
SLN: 
21222
Joint Sections: 
C LIT 200 B
Instructor:
Gordana Crnković

Syllabus Description:

 

reading image

 

DYNAMITE READS -- WORLD LITERATURE AND THE NOBEL PRIZE

C LIT 200 B & SLAVIC 175 A

 

PLEASE NOTE: C LIT 200 B AND SLAVIC 175 A ARE TWO SECTIONS OF THE SAME CLASS.

IF C LIT 200 B IS FULL, PLEASE ENROLL IN THE SLAVIC 175 A!

 

Coordinator: Professor Gordana Crnković

TAs: Raja Althobaiti & Veronica Muskheli

OFFERED VIA REMOTE LEARNING

(mostly asynchronous--you do it in your own time)

 

This course offers a grand tour of world literature as seen through the writings of Nobel Prize winners. Each year, it features a different group of authors from a range of countries, languages, and traditions. In Autumn 2020, we will read short selections from works by a few Slavic authors (Polish Wisława Szymborska and Olga Tokarczuk, Yugoslavia's Ivo Andrić; lecture by Prof. Gordana Crnković) in the first week, and in the following weeks selections by Herman Hesse (Switzerland, 1946 laureate; Prof. Ellwood Wiggins), Pablo Neruda (Chile, 1971; Prof. Tony Geist), Heinrich Böll (Germany, 1972; Prof. Annegret Oehme), Joseph Brodsky (Russia and USA, 1987;  Prof. Galya Diment), José Saramago (Portugal, 1998; Prof. Monika Kaup), Derek Walcott (Saint Lucia, 1992; Prof. Catherine Connors), Kenzaburo Oe (Japan, 1995; Prof. Ted Mack), and Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus, 2015; Prof. José Alaniz).

 

This class is team-taught: a different faculty member will be giving a lecture each week about the work of a writer from their area of expertise. In this way, this team-taught course will also provide you with a unique view of the many language and literature departments and disciplines at the UW, including Asian, Classics, English, Germanics, Slavic, and Spanish and Portuguese, as well as Comparative Literature (a major within the CMS Department). You will see that these departments, while providing a unique opportunity to learn many world languages and read their literatures in the original language, also offer a large number of classes, as well as majors and minors, that do not require a foreign language study. This class gives you a small taste of such classes, majors and minors, as all our non-English texts are given in English translation and can be read, enjoyed, and studied in such translation. Our instructors will touch on the issues of literature in translation in their lectures as well.

 

Lectures by faculty from each unit will focus on the writer and text of the week, but also discuss the wide-ranging questions of literature and the politics of prizes. Who wins, who doesn’t, and why? What does that tell us about literature and about the world in which we live?

 

Assignments include mostly asynchronous activities (you do them in your own time), and consist of readings of the materials posted on Canvas, watching lectures (prerecorded and released on the day of the class), writing online discussion posts,  and a few short quizzes (open book). The only synchronous activity (we do it at the same time) is participation in a weekly one hour-long discussion section. (You participate by being logged in and paying attention, not by forcing yourself to talk if uncomfortable.)

 

3 credits,  C/NC, 75% gives a grade of Credit. VLPA.

 

REMOTE LEARNING LINKS  

Organizer: Professor Gordana Crnković crnkovic@u.washington.edu

Office Hours: Wednesdays 3:00-5:00 PM; Zoom link:

https://washington.zoom.us/j/94137576262

 

 TeachingAssistants:  

 

Raja Althobaiti, raja12@uw.edu

Thursday 11:30-12:20  Discussion Section (Zoom) - C LIT 200 BA, Slavic 175 AA: https://washington.zoom.us/j/92700894494

Thursday 12:30-1:30 Discussion Section (Zoom) - C LIT 200 BB: https://washington.zoom.us/j/98290460934

Office Hours (Zoom):  Tuesday and Thursday 2:30-3:20: https://washington.zoom.us/j/91657320499

 

Veroniсa (Nika) Muskheli, nika@uw.edu

Thursday 11:30-12:20 Discussion Section (Zoom) - C LIT 200 BC, Slavic 175 AC:      https://washington.zoom.us/j/96149523714

Thursday 12:30-1:20 Discussion Section (Zoom) - C LIT 200 BD, SLAVIC 175 AB, AD:  https://washington.zoom.us/j/99371304250

Office Hours (Zoom): Wednesday  11:30 am - 1:30 pm:  https://washington.zoom.us/j/96851244021

 

 

     

REMOTE LEARNING

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course offers a grand tour of world literature as seen through the writings of Nobel Prize winners. Each year, it features a different group of authors from a range of countries, languages, and traditions. In Autumn 2020, we will read selections from Herman Hesse (Switzerland, 1946 laureate), Pablo Neruda (Chile, 1971), Heinrich Böll (Germany, 1972), Joseph Brodsky (Russia and USA, 1987), José Saramago (Portugal, 1998), Derek Walcott (Saint Lucia, 1992), Kenzaburo Oe (Japan, 1995), and Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus, 2015).

 

This class is team-taught: a different faculty will be giving a lecture each week about the work of a writer from their area of expertise. In this way, this team-taught course will also provide you with a unique view of the many language and literature departments and disciplines at the UW, including Asian, Classics, English, Germanics, Slavic, and Spanish and Portuguese, as well as Comparative Literature (a major within the CMS Department). You will see that these departments, while providing a unique opportunity to learn many world languages and read their literatures in the original language, also offer both a large number of classes, as well as majors and minors, that do not require a foreign language study. This class gives you a small taste of such classes, majors and minors, as all our non-English texts are given in English translation and can be read, enjoyed, and studied in such translation. Our instructors will touch on the issues of literature in translation in their lectures as well.

 

Lectures by faculty from each unit will focus on the writer and text of the week, but also discuss the wide-ranging questions of literature and the politics of prizes. Who wins, who doesn’t, and why? What does that tell us about literature and about the world in which we live?

 

Assignments include readings, watching lectures, writing online discussion posts, participation in discussion sections, and quizzes. 3 credits (for "credit or no credit"), VLPA.

The class is coordinated by Gordana Crnković, Professor of Slavic and Comparative Literature, Cinema and Media.

Goals

 

  • To gain a sense of the wealth and diversity of the world’s literatures
  • become familiar with selected authors and examples of their work
  • To learn about the politics of literary prizes
  • To gain a broad view of the Humanities at UW and its departments of languages and literatures

 

REMOTE LEARNING FORMAT

This class is offered as a remote learning one. One part of it is asynchronous (you do things on your own schedule, but before deadlines), and one synchronous (you do things with others, at the same time). The following explains our format in more detail for each part of the class.

 

Asynchronous: Readings, Lectures, Discussion Posts, Quizzes

 

Readings

All readings should be completed in advance of the lecture on them. For example, a posted excerpt from Ivo Andrić’s novel Bosnian Chronicle should be read in advance of our first lecture on October 6, readings of selections by Herman Hesse in advance of the lecture about him on October 13th, etc.

 

All the readings are posted on our Canvas course site, in the “Assignments” section, “READINGS AND LECTURES” folder. (Readings are also on “Modules.”) These weekly readings include a required part—the select text(s) written by that author—and additional, optional readings that include the author’s short biography, Nobel Prize acceptance speech, and sometimes a newspaper, magazine, or scholarly article about them. In addition, you’ll find here a list of “keywords for study,” designed to help you orient yourself better while following the lecture, as well as a faculty profile of that week’s instructor.

 

Lectures

The lectures are recorded in advance, and will be released to you on the scheduled date in order to follow as closely as possible the “live” timeline. They will be given to you as a link to Panopto Recording or another platform where you will be able to access them. This link will also be in the “Assignments’” “READINGS & LECTURES” folder of the Canvas “Assignments” section. This part of the class is asynchronous, which means that you can watch the lecture as soon as it is released, but may also watch it some hours later at your convenience.

 

Discussion Posts

On Canvas “Discussion” folder you will find discussion prompts about each week’s readings and lecture. Contribution to the online discussion board is required. Posts are due on Wednesdays, so the day after the lecture, by 3pm West Coast time. Unless there is an extenuating circumstance, late posts do not count toward credit. There are 9 opportunities to post on Canvas, each keyed to specific questions about the week’s material (lecture and readings). You can post all nine times, which increases your overall chance of doing well as each post carries a maximum of 5 points. Please note that writing 7 posts of at least 100 words each is the minimum for a course grade of “credit.” Focus on the material and the question asked of it.

 

Quizzes

Quizzes will be published on Thursdays of October 22, November 5, November 19, and December 10. You will have 47 hours to open and complete the quiz, in order to accommodate for a different time-zone you may be in, poor internet connection, work or family obligations, etc. However, make sure you can take one focused hour for the quiz once you open it. Once you start the quiz, you have to finish it within one hour. The format may vary, but each short quiz will touch on the latest readings, lectures, and discussions (that is, on the material covered since the previous quiz). Unless there are special circumstances, no alternate or make-up quizzes will be offered.

 

 

 

 

Synchronous: Discussion in Sections

 

Discussion in Sections

You are required to attend the one hour-long discussion sections on Thursday, which will be conducted by our two teaching assistants, Raja and Veronika (Nika). Everyone registered for the course should be available during section time, as this is a synchronous part of the class. While some students are more reluctant to talk than others, and the online format may not be the best for inducing participation, you are all required to join in over Zoom these discussion sessions, and be ready to offer some thoughts if and when “cold-called.” In other words, do not join in and then turn off your video and audio to do something else, as you may easily be called upon to say something.

 

Your participation will be mostly assessed by your active presence—it means, most of all, that  you should be there in the Zoom discussion session, and be able to reply if asked a question. You should talk and participate as much as this is comfortable for you.

 

Please see the top right corner of this syllabus, with the TA information, to find out the Zoom link for your discussion section!

 

 

GRADES, REQUIREMENTS, AND ASSESSMENT

Course grades (“credit or no credit”) will be calculated as follows:

- Online discussion posts: 45% (9 posts at 5 points maximum each)

- Quizzes: 40% (4 quizzes at 10 points each)

- In-class participation (in discussion sections): 15%

 

You must achieve a total of 75% in order to pass this course and receive a grade of “credit."

 

 

COMMUNICATING WITH INSTRUCTORS

Both the organizing instructor Professor Crnković and the two TA-s, Nika and Raja, will hold regular office hours at the same time each week. See our schedule at the top of this syllabus, as well as the Zoom links which will enable you to join us. Please avail yourself of this opportunity to have your individual concerns addressed, or simply to just check in with us. The office hours will be conducted via Zoom, and give an opportunity for one-on-one consultation. You may be asked to “wait” in the waiting room until we are done talking to the previous student, in order to respect everyone’s privacy.

 

In addition, the faculty profiles of our instructors, posted on their “Assignment” pages, give you their emails. You are always welcome to email them with regard to specific questions about their own lectures, authors, or field of study.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE OF THE CLASS

 

Th, October 1

Introduction to the Class & What Is Literature?

A Few Words on Select Nobel laureates from the Slavic region:

Wisława Szymborska & Olga Tokarczuk (Poland 1996 & 2018, Polish language)

Speaker:  Gordana Crnković, Slavic and Comparative Literature, Cinema & Media

 

Tu, October 6

Ivo Andrić (Yugoslavia 1961, BCMS language)

Speaker: Gordana Crnković

Read and view: Selections by Ivo Andrić on Canvas

Online post: Due W 10/7 by 3pm

Th 10/8 Section: Discuss Intro lesson and Slavic winners, with focus on Andrić

 

Tu, October 13

Herman Hesse (Switzerland 1946, German language)

Speaker: Ellwood Wiggins, Germanics

Read and view: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 10/14 by 3pm

Th 10/15 Section: Discuss Hesse

 

 

Tu, October 20

Pablo Neruda (Chile 1971, Spanish)

Speaker: Tony Geist, Spanish and Portuguese

Read and view: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 10/21 by 3pm

Th 10/22 Section: Discuss Neruda

Fri 10/23: Quiz 1

 

 

Tu, October 27

Svetlana Alexievich (Belarus, Russian language, 2015)

Speaker: José Alaniz, Slavic Languages & Literatures

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 10/28 by 3pm

Th 10/29 Section: Discuss Alexievich

 

Tu, November 3

Heinrich Böll (Germany, German language; 1972)

Speaker: Annegret Oehme, Germanics

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 11/4 by 3pm

Th 11/5 Section: Discuss Böll

Fri 11/6: Quiz 2

 

 

Tu, November 10

Derek Walcott (Saint Lucia, English; 1992)

Speaker: Catherine Connors, Classics

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 11/11 by 3pm

Th 11/12: Discuss Walcott

 

Tu, November 17

José Saramago (Portugal, Portuguese; 1998)

Speaker: Monika Kaup, English

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 11/18 by 3pm

Th 11/19 Section: Discuss Saramago

Fri 11/20: Quiz 3

 

Tu, November 24 -- Review Session

Speaker: Gordana Crnković, Professor of Slavic and CLCM

No online post due this week

Th 11/26 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY: NO CLASS

 

Tu, December 1

Joseph Brodsky (USSR and USA, Russian and English; 1987)

Speaker: Galya Diment, Slavic Languages and Literature

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online post: Due W 12/2 by 3pm

Th 12/3 Section: Discuss Brodsky

 

Tu, December 8

Kenzaburo Oe (Japan, Japanese; 1995)

Speaker: Ted Mack, Asian Languages and Literature

Read: Selections on Canvas

Online Post: Due W 12/9 by 3 pm

Th 12/10 Section: Discuss Kenzaburo

Fri 12/11: Quiz 4

 

 

                            OTHER MATTERS OF IMPORTANCE   ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The University takes academic integrity very seriously. Behaving with integrity is part of our responsibility to our shared learning community. If you’re uncertain about if something is academic misconduct, ask me. I am willing to discuss questions you might have.

Acts of academic misconduct may include but are not limited to:

  • Cheating (working collaboratively on quizzes/exams and discussion submissions, sharing answers and previewing quizzes/exams)
  • Plagiarism (representing the work of others as your own without giving appropriate credit to the original author(s))
  • Unauthorized collaboration (working with each other on assignments)

Concerns about these or other behaviors prohibited by the Student Conduct Code may be referred for investigation and adjudication.

Students found to have engaged in academic misconduct may receive a zero on the assignment, or other possible outcome.

  RELIGIOUS ACCOMODATIONS

Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at Religious Accommodations Policy (https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/). Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using the Religious Accommodations Request form (https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/).

 

DISABILITY RESOURCES

Your experience in this class is important to me. If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.

If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.

RESPECT

We aspire to create a classroom environment that encourages and welcomes different perspectives. How do we learn anything in the absence of robust engagement with ideas and views that differ from our own? Respect for different views and the people who express them does not necessarily mean agreement with them; at a minimum, it means that we should cultivate gratitude for the opportunity to re-examine our habits of thought. Let’s work together and show mutual respect.

 

 

*****

 

For more information on disability accommodations, academic integrity, safety, and religious accommodations, please see the information at this ink:

 

https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/syllabi-guidelines/?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTjJKall6bGtPRGhsWldZeSIsInQiOiJ2RGNGRHpKWGdTVEpydkxuS1IyTkp2NlZmTnhqeHVDMkZ2N2EzbTZuNG5EK1FHdTJKOVNCTTBnQUV2aHM4NVdcL1lPVEc5MFYrTlo0c1p1YlNLM0NXYjVXaWUydnZSNTdZNHBUazYwcmFRM1dcL0JkWVczRWVBOWxwamQ4QjVHanlqIn0%3D

 

*****

Guidance to Students Taking Courses Outside the U.S.

Faculty members at U.S. universities – including the University of Washington – have the right to academic freedom which includes presenting and exploring topics and content that other governments may consider to be illegal and, therefore, choose to censor. Examples may include topics and content involving religion, gender and sexuality, human rights, democracy and representative government, and historic events.

If, as a UW student, you are living outside of the United States while taking courses remotely, you are subject to the laws of your local jurisdiction. Local authorities may limit your access to course material and take punitive action towards you. Unfortunately, the University of Washington has no authority over the laws in your jurisdictions or how local authorities enforce those laws.

If you are taking UW courses outside of the United States, you have reason to exercise caution when enrolling in courses that cover topics and issues censored in your jurisdiction. If you have concerns regarding a course or courses that you have registered for, please contact your academic advisor who will assist you in exploring options.

 

Catalog Description: 
A contextual study of a significant work or intellectual movement from a Slavic culture. Study includes literature, film, music, or art. Credit/no-credit only.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
3.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
March 17, 2021 - 12:06pm
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