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RUSS 324 A: Russian Folk Literature In English

Photo of Bilibin Baba Yaga and Ivashka
Meeting Time: 
TTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Location: 
SAV 137
SLN: 
19251
Joint Sections: 
C LIT 396 B
Instructor:
Veronica Muskheli

Syllabus Description:

RUSSIAN FOLK LITERATURE

(Russian 324 A/Comparative Literature 396 B), Spring 2020

 

Instructor: Ms. Veronica Muskheli, Ph.C.   Email: nika@uw.edu

Time: Asynchronous online course run on Canvas

Office hours: Tu and Th 7-8 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST) and by appointment

Office: Zoom or Canvas chat        Join URL: https://washington.zoom.us/j/287664358    

 

OVERVIEW

The course explores the diversity of forms, themes, types, and functions of the Russian folktale, the narrative art of the culturally marginalized Russian peasantry, and its influence on Russian literature.

 

FORMAT

Students read folktales, literary works, and texts that provide theoretical framework(s) for interpretation of the stories. On Canvas, students study a deck of Power Point slides for each topic and participate in online discussions by typing their comments and questions. Students write one-page analyses of texts consistently throughout the quarter and produce a longer and more in-depth final paper.

 

TEXTS

Required Texts:

  1. Gogol, Nikolai. The Collected Tales of, translated and annotated by Pevear and Volokhonsky (Random House, ISBN 0-375-70615-1)
  2. Ivanits, Linda J. Russian Folk Belief (M.E. Sharpe, NY, ISBN 0-87332-889-2)
  3. Petrushevskaya, Ludmilla. There Once Lived a Woman Who Tried to Kill her Neighbor's Baby (ISBN 978-0-14-311466-6)
  4. Propp, Vladimir. Morphology of the Folktale (U of Texas Press, ISBN 0-292-78376-0)
  5. 5. Russian Fairy Tales Collected by Aleksandr Afanas’ev, translated by Norbert Guterman (Pantheon Books, ISBN 0-394-73090-9)

—all books are available for purchase at the UBookstore and online

  1. Scanned files placed in each weekly Module on Canvas

 

LEARNING GOALS

-To become familiar with Russia and many Russian folk narratives

-To become familiar with genres of folk literature

-To become familiar with a few theoretical frameworks for interpretation of the texts, particularly Russian Structuralism and its Propp functions

-To become familiar with Thompson Motif-Index and Aarne-Thompson-Uther tale typology

-To improve critical thinking skills by exercising them in analysis of the primary texts and theoretical readings

 

 

 

 

STUDENT WORK EVALUATION

 

Assigned Values:

Participation: 30%

Written assignments: 30%

First draft of the final paper: 10%

Final paper: 30%

 

Participation:

Your participation is evaluated on the quality of your comments in each weekly Discussion on Canvas in response to discussion points provided by the instructor in that week’s deck of slides or (better yet!) comments or questions initiated by the students in response to the slides and texts. To get 4.0, you have to write at least two substantive and thoughtful comments (that is, not long but having a point) for every week’s discussion, and at least one of those comments has to be in response to one of your classmates’ contribution(s). The comments are not evaluated on their grammar, style, etc., but you should try to express your ideas clearly as a courtesy to fellow discussants and to avoid being misunderstood. And, of course, you all show respect for each other’s opinions and ways of their expression.

 

Weekly written assignments:

These are responses to weekly prompts in Assignments and could be developed from anybody’s comments in the discussion—yours included. Weekly written assignments should have a thesis statement (1st or 2nd sentence) and support for the development of that thesis. The papers should be in Word (doc or docx format) and are one page, double-spaced, 12 point Times Roman, 1”-margin. They should be submitted on Canvas by 11:59 pm PST on Wednesday every week, starting with Week 2; to get full credit, you should submit 6 out of 7 possible response papers on time. Late work is accepted with 0.1 of the grade penalty for each late day.

 

The first draft of the final paper:

The final paper is a compare-and-contrast study of two texts: a folktale from the course and another text of your choice, either from or outside the course. The paper should be 5-7 pages long, MLA style https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/: double-spaced, 12 point Times Roman font, 1”-margin. (If you seek Writing Credit, the paper is 10-12 pages). The first draft of your final paper has to be submitted on Canvas by 11:59 pm PST on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. It is evaluated using the same rubric as for the short written assignments. The first draft will be returned to your with the instructor’s comments by 11:59 pm PST on Wednesday, June 3. Late work will not be accepted unless negotiated with the instructor ahead of time due to special circumstances in the student’s life.

 

Final paper:

The final paper is evaluated using the same rubric as for the short written assignments and by how well the author responds to the instructor’s comments on the first draft. The final paper is due on Canvas on Wednesday, June 10, by 11:59 pm PST. Late work will not be accepted unless negotiated with the instructor ahead of time due to special circumstances in the student’s life.

 

Rubric for grading written assignments and the final paper       

 

%

Thesis

%

Support

%

Mechanics

 

40%

Has a substantive, specific, defendable, and clearly stated thesis that addresses the topic

40%

The thesis is persuasively argued by examples from the text(s) in an organized and clear way

20%

Has few if any grammar problems and has correct format for citations

30%

Has a substantive but too broad thesis statement, impossible to explore in the allowed space

30%

Has some logical issues with support of the thesis by selected examples and/or organization of the argument

15%

Has a few grammar and spelling errors and/or minor issues with citation format

20%

Has a superficial thesis statement

20%

Has major logical issues with support of the thesis by selected examples

10%

Has multiple grammar and spelling errors and/or major issues with citation format

10%

The  thesis statement lacks clarity

10%

Does not have enough examples and/or does not demonstrate the connection between the thesis and examples

5%

Has multiple grammar and spelling errors causing considerable problems with reader’s understanding

0%

No thesis statement or the statement is off  topic

0%

Has no examples to support the thesis

0%

Impossible to read because of poor grammar and spelling

 

Grade Conversion Table

Percent

Grade

Letter

 

Percent

Grade

Letter

 

Percent

Grade

Letter

100-99

4.0

A

 

81

2.6

B-

 

67

1.2

D+

  97-98

3.9

A

 

80

2.5

B-

 

66

1.1

D

  95-96

3.8

A-

 

79

2.4

C+

 

65

1.0

D

  93-94

3.7

A-

 

78

2.3

C+

 

64

0.9

D

  91-92

3.6

A-

 

77

2.2

C+

 

63-62

0.8

D-

       90

3.5

A-

 

76

2.1

C

 

61-60

0.7

D-

       89

3.4

B+

 

75

2.0

C

 

59

0.6

E

       88

3.3

B+

 

74

1.9

C

 

58

0.5

E

       87

3.2

B+

 

73

1.8

C-

 

57

0.4

E

       86

3.1

B

 

72

1.7

C-

 

56

0.3

E

       85

3.0

B

 

71

1.6

C-

 

55

0.2

E

       84

2.9

B

 

70

1.5

C-

 

54

0.1

E

       83

2.8

B-

 

69

1.4

D+

 

53-1

0.0

E

       82

2.7

B-

 

68

1.3

D+

 

 

 

 

 

CLASS CONDUCT POLICIES:

 

Disability Accommodations To request academic accommodations due to disability, please contact Disabled Student Services, 448 Schmitz, (206) 543-8924. If you have a letter from Disabled Student Services indicating that you a have a disability that requires academic accommodations, please present the letter to me at the beginning of the course so we can discuss the accommodations you might need in this class.

 

Academic Dishonesty You all begin this course with my full trust and confidence. To avoid any problems with plagiarism, you may wish to refer to the College of Arts and Sciences’ Policy on Academic Responsibility at http://depts.washington.edu/grading/pdf/AcademicResponsibility.pdf You are welcome to speak to me if any of the rules remain unclear. It is my responsibility to report any warranted cases of academic dishonesty to the relevant University of Washington legal authorities.

Catalog Description: 
Explores the diversity of forms, themes, and functions of the Russian folktale, the literary art of the historically and culturally marginalized Russian peasantry. Discussion of theoretical frameworks for interpretation, resistance strategies, and with dominant literary models.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
July 27, 2020 - 5:17pm
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